THE NATURAL SOLUTION – LIQUID MANURE SIDEDRESS DRAGLINE APPLICATION

March 6, 2018

Research courtesy of Glen Arnold, Associate Professor & Field Specialist Manure Nutrient Management Application, The Ohio State University

DRAGLINE APPLICATION

PREPARATION

From the research previously conducted using tank applications, OSU realized the opportunity dragline application held. A glaring concern with sidedressing using a dragline system, was the effect the weight of the hose would have on the emerging corn plants and the yield they would later produce. The team at OSU began their testing on plots with corn between growth stages V1-V5, challenging their immediate concerns.

IN FIELD STUDY

To coincide with studying the effects of drag hose on plant stand/yield, a field study with liquid swine manure was conducted. The dragline study was carried out in Dark County, Ohio on corn post-emergent before the V4 stage.

YEARSWINE MANURE | BU/ACRE28% UAN | BU/ACRE
2016222216
2015154121
2014204204

 

RESULTS

Three years of data revealed no significant damage to corn stand until the V4 to V5 growth stage. The V4 stands were identical in 2014 and 2016, but due to a wet spring in 2015, the V4 stand was poor, which tremendously lowered the average.

CORN GROWTH STAGE3 YR. POPULATION AVERAGE3 YR. AVERAGE BU/ACRE
NO DRAG HOSE30,214152.5
V1
(One visible leaf collar)
30,012155.4
V2
(Two visible leaf collars)
30,222154.8
V3
(Three visible leaf collars)
29,853156.9
V4
(Four visible leaf collars)
26,755141.8
V5
(Five visible leaf collars)
15,683118.0*

*Indicates only 2 years of data

 

INJECTION VS. BROADCAST

INJECTION:

  • Reduction in ammonia volatilization
  • Increased organic matter throughout the soil profile
  • Reduced odor during and after applications

BROADCAST:

  • Vulnerable to surface runoff in storm and irrigation events
  • Stricter guidelines for application times
  • Nutrients are not readily available for the crop 

 


TANK APPLICATION

OBJECTIVE

To establish a more effective window for manure application, provide crops with proper nutrients at an essential time, and reduce purchased fertilizer costs.

RESULTS

Replacing 28% Urea Ammonium Nitrate (UAN) with liquid livestock manure, resulted in a 10 to 12 percent increase in bushels per acre, over a 5 year period. Note that the incorporated manure outperformed the surface-applied manure as well. These results are shown on Chart 1 below.

PREVIOUS RESEARCH

The Ohio State University (OSU) conducted small-plot research from 2012 to 2016 with liquid swine and dairy manure. More than 45 smaller, on-farm plots were used throughout this period, along with larger, field size plots. Manure was applied with a tanker when the corn reached the V2-V3 growth stages. Pre-emergent & post-emergent comparisons were conducted for manure placed head to head with 28% Urea Ammonium Nitrate (UAN) as well. All comparisons were applied at an equal rate of 200 pounds of available nitrogen.

PLOT RESULTS

2012-2016 OARDC MANURE SIDEDRESS | BUSHELS PER ACRE

PRE-EMERGENT TREATMENTS5 YEAR AVG. BU/ACRE
Incorporated
28% UAN
142.6
Swine Manure
Surface-Applied
131.6
Swine Manure
Incorporated
158.2
Dairy Manure
Surface Applied
+ 28% UAN
126.7
Dairy Manure
Incorporated
+ 28% UAN
158.7
POST-EMERGENT TREATMENTS5 YEAR AVG. BU/ACRE
Incorporated
28% UAN
144.8
Swine Manure
Surface-Applied
137.5
Swine Manure
Incorporated
163.4
Dairy Manure
Surface Applied
+ 28% UAN
135.2
Dairy Manure
Incorporated
+ 28% UAN
164.6

Chart 1. Ohio Agriculture Research and Development Center (OARDC) Manure Sidedress Plot Results

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